New Hybrid Distribution at OSFB

On September 16th, the Ocean Shores Food Bank rolled out a new option for guests, when they come to pickup their food.


Guests may continue to drive-up to collect their food (our current method) or they may now enter the food bank and choose for themselves which items they would like.

Upon entering the car line at the gates, an attendant will come to your car window and ask which method you prefer.

If you would like to come inside and shop, you will be directed to a parking spot inside the gates where you’ll then register for your household. There will be a tent outside for guests, while they wait their turn inside.

Harry valiantly holds down the counter to prevent it from floating away.

Only six people will be allowed in the shop at a time. An exception to this rule is that guests will be allowed to bring in accompanying small children. No pets are allowed inside; service animals only.

All guests will be required to wear masks regardless of vaccination status; this includes those who choose the drive-up option. If you do not have a mask, one will be provided for you.

Once inside, guests will be provided a sanitized basket for their food. A volunteer will be available to help you shop and guide you through the food bank.

Social distancing will be enforced. We want everyone to remain safe and healthy so we can continue to allow the indoor shopping option.

Once you have finished shopping, a wagoneer will help you to your car with your food. If you have books to pick up, the wagoneer will help you with that as well.

We hope you will enjoy this new option for picking up your food.

Some of the half-faces you’ll see at the food bank:

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

Benefit Mini-Golf Tournament – Sept. 15, 3-7pm

Mark your calendars!

for the

Ocean Shores Food Bank

Benefit Mini-Golf Tournament

September 15th, 3pm to 7pm

This event is proudly sponsored by

Pacific Paradise

767 Minard Avenue NW, Ocean Shores.

And get your tickets!

Tickets are $25 dollars per person and are available at these two locations:

Get your tickets early, as this event is limited to 144 golfers (no professionals please).

Businesses may sponsor special signage at each hole for $100.

There will be:

  • a no-host beer & wine bar
  • raffle prizes
  • a trophy

Gather your friends and neighbors; come individually or enter as a team.

For more information, email: osshipandprint@gmail.com

Or by phone, contact Kathy Harris at (509) 899-5694.

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

Is That Food Past Its “Date” Okay?

— by Shannon Middleton

Have you ever wondered what exactly the date on a box of cereal means? Is the date on a carton of eggs when they are no longer good? How do you know if a product is still ok to eat? How does the Ocean Shores Food Bank decide what foods are safe to give to guests?

Volunteers at the food bank care not just about eliminating hunger in our community but about the health and safety of our guests. We want you to know that we have processes in place to sort out unsafe food and would never knowingly give you food that is no longer edible.

“If I wouldn’t eat it, I’m not going to put it out there,” said Kathy Baker, one of the six members of our donation sorting team.

This includes donations of severely dented cans, opened packages including opened packages of pet food, food that has no date, and food that has spoiled. On average, about ten percent of donations we receive must be discarded for these reasons.

But what about food that is beyond its best-by date or sell-by date? Is that still safe to eat?

Yes! According to the USDA best-by dates refer to only the quality of the food (freshness, taste, and texture), not when the food is no longer good or safe to eat. In fact, some canned foods are good up to four years past their best-by date. Eggs are still considered safe to eat four to five weeks after their sell-by date, if they are kept refrigerated at 45 degrees F. Unopened cereal lasts six to eight months past the date on the box. Uncooked meat can be stored in the freezer for four months.

Sell-by dates let stores know how long to display the product for sale. This is not mandatory, however, and again refers only to the freshness and quality of the food.

Expiration dates refer to the last date food should be eaten or used. These dates are, however, also voluntary.

The only foods that the USDA requires to have an expiration date are infant formula and some baby foods.

According to the Cleveland Clinic, sure signs of spoiled food include mold, an “off” smell, a different texture than expected, or an unpleasant taste. If a product has any of these signs, it is best to trash it.

One of the ways we source our donated food, where we must follow specific safe-handling protocols, is through Food Lifeline’s Retail and Food Service Partnerships Program. We receive food items, weekly, from Safeway in Aberdeen. According to Harry Yanagimachi, our transportation manager, because our building is located more than 30 minutes from the source, “strict handling and temperature checks are dictated.”

That means that frozen foods, prepared deli, and prepackaged items need to be temperature-checked at Safeway and register below 41 degrees F. “If not, we cannot accept them.” The food is then packed in ice. Temperatures are measured again and recorded, when they arrive at the food bank, to confirm that they are still at 41 degrees F. If not, they are discarded. Food that will not keep until the next distribution is donated to other sources that are able to use it more immediately.

Hopefully, you now have a better sense of meaning of food dates and our safe-handling practices at the Ocean Shores Food Bank.

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

Awesome Ace Hardware March Round-Up

— by Shannon Middleton

Once again, our community’s generosity shines forth. This time the Ocean Shores Food Bank was the recipient of Buck Electric Ace Hardware’s Round-Up fundraiser. An incredible $5509.99 was donated by the store’s customers during the month of March.

Customers were asked at check-out if they’d like to round-up the price of their purchase to the nearest whole dollar amount, according to company president Steve Buck.

“Some people even donate more than that,” Buck said. “Our community is generous. $69,000 was donated throughout the year (for all causes) just from customers. It’s all from the heart.”

While the original Round-Up campaign started as part of the Ace Hardware national fundraiser for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, Buck said he asked his staff to pick their favorite local charities to continue roundup campaign year-round. He said the company likes to focus on local organizations.

The Ocean Shores Food Bank is most grateful to both Ace Hardware and the community for their generous support. The money will go toward continued program funding.

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

2nd Annual Plant Sale an Amazing Success!

— by Shannon Middleton

Before the opening hour they were lined up: gardeners, plant enthusiasts, and even those with black-thumbs who just wanted to show their support for the Ocean Shores Food Bank. The 2nd Annual Ocean Shores Plant Sale on May 1st drew people from all over town and some from out of town. Even the sun put in an appearance, the expected rain held off, making it a great day to have a plant sale.

And sales were swift. Plants sold so quickly there was talk among volunteers staffing the event that the sale, which started at 9am and was supposed to run until 3pm, might be over by noon. Half of the plants 600 plants were sold within the first 90 minutes.


“We live in an amazing community and that was apparent last Saturday when, with great enthusiasm, the population came, viewed and bought over 450 plants,” said Judy Mitchel, Vice President of Program Services for the Ocean Shores Food Bank and Plant Committee Chair.

A benefit for the Ocean Shores Food Bank, the plant sale generated $8,159 and $6,895 was raised in donations, according to Sandy Harley, Executive Director of the food bank.

Additionally, Ocean Sunset Drug the site host, donated $2,500 toward the purchase of plants and goods. Jackie Fischer and Ocean Sunset Drug have been  ongoing supporters of the food bank and the sale was one such example of her tremendous contribution to fighting hunger in the community.

Volunteers from the food bank worked tirelessly to organize the sale. They contributed 350 plants, some of which they grew themselves, and handmade some of the yard art that was available for purchase. The selection of plants included everything from hanging baskets of bright fuchsias, to herb and veggie starts. Ever popular succulents made up a large and interesting portion of the sale, too. Truly, there was something for every gardener.

An estimated 100 to 150 volunteer hours went into coordinating and planning to make the sale possible. Other food bank volunteers literally did the heavy lifting, bringing out and setting up tables for the plants. Then, in closing, they repeated the process in reverse. Some also carted plants by wagon out to community members’ cars.

A Master Gardener was available on site to answer questions and was constantly surrounded by eager listeners. Her presence was certainly an added bounce to the sale.

Other business sponsors included Lavender Hill, Garden Starts Nursery, Roadhouse Nursery, Ace Hardware, Garden By the Sea and Master Gardeners.

In case you missed the sale, or just want more, unsold plants are still available at Ocean Sunset Drug.

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

2nd Annual Plant Sale: Sat. May 1st, 9am-3pm

121 E Chance a La Mer
Ocean Shores, WA

Benefits Ocean Shores Food Bank

  • Big plant selection
  • Hanging baskets
  • Deer-resistant plants
  • Indoor & outdoor plants & starts

Master Gardener on site 10am – 1pm

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

Meet OSFB’s “Team Rugh”

Anita and Jerry Rugh have worked at the Ocean Shores Food Bank since 2016, after relocating from the Seattle area. Both started off stocking shelves and were soon promoted to management positions, due to their intelligence, hard work, and striking personalities. This is their story, by Gary Josephson, Roving Reporter

Q: How did you meet?

Anita: Jerry lived in San Diego his whole life and I had moved there. We started going to his church.

Jerry: We disputed whether we met at a church potluck or at a Mothers’ Day event.

Anita: It was a potluck on Mothers’ Day!

Jerry: I saw her from across the room. She and her sister came over and sat down next to me.

Anita: He thought my sister was cute until he realized that she had a baby and was married. (Jerry starts chuckling.) Then he thought I was cute until he found out I had a baby too. (Both start laughing). I was divorced at the time.

Q: Once you got over the baby obstacles was there an instant spark?

Jerry: We went out the next day!

Anita: We went to a volleyball game together. We were married five and a half months after that.

Q: What brought you to Washington?

Jerry: We took a driving vacation and discovered the Pacific Northwest. We were coming back from Victoria, driving down 101 and Anita said, “Stop the car, take my suitcase out; this is where I want to live!” It took us 9 years to get here, but we made it.

Q: How did you hear about the Ocean Shores Food Bank and what were your first jobs as volunteers?

Anita: After the first of the year living in Ocean Shores (2015) I sent an email to their Website and within 15 minutes got a response, introducing us to the food bank. They did not need help with distribution, so we became worker bees at Tuesday work groups instead.

Jerry: We were stocking shelves. While helping another volunteer move cases of cereal, I fell and broke my elbow.

Anita: (laughing heartily) The second week there!

Jerry: I was basically just stocking shelves and getting ready for distribution. We did not even know what distribution was at that point. Mike Lull, our wonderful Operations Manager, was very patient with us and thought that maybe we could help him in other areas.

Anita: Mike taught me how to check the refrigerator and freezer temperatures every week. The very first thing I did was sort green bags from other bags that were donated. I flattened those green bags and put them in boxes! Eventually we moved into other areas of responsibility and continued sorting and boxing bags.

Q: That was a great segue into my next question. You both play major roles in the running of our food bank. Could you please describe your current duties?

Anita: I am the Volunteer Coordinator, which means I contact the potential volunteers, inviting them to a work group. If they cannot make the work group, I invite them to meet me at another time, so I can get to know them better. Once they have worked a few times, I give them a full food bank packet to complete. I keep all their paperwork and stay in touch. I make sure the job they are assigned is something they enjoy doing. (Our volunteers walk in and work; you do not have to babysit them!) I also help Sandy Harley (Executive Director), creating and printing documents. I oversee our database and do food bank reports. I really enjoy my duties.

Jerry: I am big on documentation. When I took on a management role, I took the task of writing an Operations Manual and going through every aspect of what we do. If we ever got hit by a bus, there is someone you could hand this to, and the food bank would continue to run. I am also chair of the Operations Management Group (OMG) and that put me on the Ocean Shores Food Bank Board. We were looking for a new location for the food bank. We started the process to buy property from Galilean Church but had to deal with wetland issues. (I proposed buying the other half of the property that did not have those problems.) I am now the Building Committee Chairman. This week I am sending out a request for architects, while the church is finishing up its subdivisions.

Q: What is your favorite food bank story?

Anita: During our second week at the food bank, a volunteer is telling Jerry not to go up on a step stool to pull down boxes. But no, “macho man” can do it. So, what does he do? He slips, falls, and fractures his elbow. Jerry thinks he can get Workman’s Comp for it and I say there is no way after only two weeks that we are filing for Workman’s Comp! So, for the next six weeks I worked while Jerry stayed home.

Jerry: I look forward to Don (a food bank client) coming through, because he never wants much and has the biggest smile on his face. He is always looking for hot dogs. If we ever have any hot dogs in the building, we save them up for Don!

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

 

Thanks to Seaside Liquidation Outlet & Fresh Market and Community

The Ocean Shores Food Bank, its volunteers and clients wish to thank the Seaside Liquidation Outlet & Fresh Market and our community. During last month’s round-up event, they raised $1,097.  This is round-up change that helps change people’s lives. With Seaside Liquidation Outlet & Fresh Market and our community we can fulfill our mission “so no one in our community goes hungry.” Thank You!

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

 

IGA Major 2021 Update & Donation

A great big thank you to the Ocean Shores IGA and our wonderfully generous community.
Here’s the scoop, by Leon Brauner

Last month IGA asked their customers if they would care to round-up their grocery purchase to the next dollar. When all that change was added up it totaled $6,364.56 donated to the Ocean Shores Food Bank. In a further act of generosity, the Ocean Shores IGA added a $1,000 check to the community total. That is money that will be used to purchase food, “so that no one in our community goes hungry.”

Photo of IGA Manager, Kayla Leganza, OSFB Executive Director Sandy Harley, and OSFB Community  Relations head, Barbara Patton.

You can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – Click DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

Last Food Distribution of 2020

Our December 22nd, Christmas distribution was also our last distribution of 2020. While the temperatures were a little cooler than usual, the wind was not its blustery self and, occasionally, the sun broke through the overcast.

Our hearty volunteers, many having donned Santa hats, were kept busy giving out ham with all the trimmings, as well as warm knit mittens, scarves, and hats. Our resident Santa and his able helpers also gave out small seasonal gifts.

Even though the outdoor temperatures weren’t too warm, the warm hearts and smiles (beneath the masks) helped make the day, a day of happiness and pleasure.

Two hundred and fifty-five households were served with pleasure, respect and holiday spirit.

———

You too can help our many friends and neighbors in need. It’s easy, just click on the links below to donate or sign-up for our newsletter.

>>> OSFB DONATE TODAY – click: DONATE TODAY or send your check to Ocean Shores Food Bank, PO Box 1293, Ocean Shores, WA 98569.

>>> OSFB NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP – click: NEWSLETTER SIGNUP and learn more what you can do to help reduce food insecurity in North Beach.

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